I kept wondering if there could be a safe, healthy way for the kids to experience Halloween this year. Turns out there isn't really.

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The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued it's first set of guidelines for the holidays Monday night and it includes Halloween.

Many traditional Halloween activities can be high-risk for spreading viruses,” the CDC said. “There are several safer, alternative ways to participate in Halloween. If you may have COVID-19 or you may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should not participate in in-person Halloween festivities and should not give out candy to trick-or-treaters.

According to the CDC the public should avoid the following “higher-risk activities”:

  • Traditional trick-or-treating in which treats are given to children going door to door
  • Trunk-or-treat, in which treats are given from trunks of cars lined up in large parking lots
  • Crowded indoor costume parties
  • Indoor haunted house where people may be crowded together and screaming
  • Hayrides or tractor rides with people outside your household
  • Using alcohol or drugs, which can cloud judgment and increase risky behaviors
  • Travel to a rural fall festival that is not in your community if you live in an area with community spread of COVID-19

The CDC website does list activities that provide less of a risk like "participating in one-way trick-or-treating where individually wrapped goodie bags are lined up for families to grab and go while continuing to social distance (such as at the end of a driveway or at the edge of a yard)."

You can find a list of other activities at the CDC's website here.