In Tipton, IA. these women mean business.

Honestly, I have been itching to write about this terrible story all week but wanted to make sure I was calm enough, because this entire story of the Stanford rapist and how it ended up is horrible.

It's not every day that we hear of spells, curses, and witchcraft. Most of us think that only happens in a Harry Potter movie and is 'Hocus Pocus.'  But when it's in your backyard, and that 'backyard' goes viral, something very real opens up in you and realizes, it's not a joke.

Earlier this week, California Judge Aaron Persky, sentenced Stanford swimmer, Brock Turner to six months in jail for raping an unconscious woman. This stirred outrage around the world. Women (and refreshingly, some men) felt even more defeated by the fact Brock Turner will be let out after 3 months for 'good behavior.' How ironic.

A Davenport, IA. original, Melanie Elizabeth Hexen, now from Tipton, IA. set the witch-world a blaze with one creative idea to bring women together earlier this week, to set a worldwide hex on Brock Turner, his dad, Dan Turner (who said his son's assault came down to only '20 minutes of action), and Judge Perksy.

Melanie created a Facebook event page (which has since been taken down) inviting witches, and those who affiliate with such pagan practices, to join her at 10 p.m. for a virtual ceremony to cast a spell. Some cast a hex for his pain, nightmares when he sleeps, and even impotence. While others cast positivity for the woman whom he raped.

Locally, somewhere near the Tipton, IA. area, Melanie's 13 'sisters' joined her for the ritual. Hundreds, if not thousands worldwide, joined online. Some shared pictures of their own altars, rituals, and curses.

Melanie tells Broadly.vice.com,

"There must have been a huge need for this for it to blow up so fast," Hexen said. "We all felt so much injustice and anger and sadness and the need to connect on a psychological level with other people who felt the same and could do something about it."

Personally, I think it's empowering when women come together and say 'no more.' This case exposes the horrible rape culture we all live in. I want better for my daughters. I want better for all women and young girls who will face the Brock Turners of the world. Because it's not a matter of 'if,' it's a matter of 'when.'  As a society, we should expect much better than this and thanks to women and men willing to stand up, we will.