Something doesn't sound quite right here.

Remember last year when a team couldn't play a game because one or more of it's players,  or staff tested positive for COVID-19? The game would be cancelled and the league would try to re-schedule. That's all changed now.

This year, the team that needs to cancel because of COVID will now forfeit the game and it will not be rescheduled. This season the game is considered a loss for the team who cancels and a win for the opposing team. If both teams are unable to play the game will count as a no-contest according to the Big Ten.

Something sounds fishy to me. Will there now be more players, coaches and staff who won't divulge he's positive for the virus? This isn't good. Didn't it seem like better sportsmanship  to postpone, reschedule or simply forfeit with no penalty?

This new policy seems to be in line with other Power 5 conferences including the Pac-12, ACC, and Big 12 according to the Gazette. Those conferences had already announced there would be forfeits if a team in unable to play because of a COVID-19 outbreak.

The SEC has not formally announced its policy, but commissioner Greg Sankey says teams unable to play will forfeit, according to ESPN.

You might recall Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz said that "not quite“ 70% of the Hawkeye football team was vaccinated, and announced that “number was going up,” at Iowa media day on Friday, Aug. 14. Let's hope everyone stays healthy this year or it's going to be a bumpy college football season.

LOOK: Answers to 30 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.

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